Help Miss Mildred retire!

help-mildred-our-dear-electric-stove-retire-with-dignity_yes-more-please

Hello, friends! hope this finds you well and cooking, we have some last minute news about our Dear electric stove Miss Mildred, it is time to retire.

Today we are reaching out to the world for help.

We received the news a few days ago, after she accidentally became blind, after trying to change her light bulb in the oven, and noticing that the metal cast had melted into the socket. Unfurtunatelly, she is trying to tell us she can’t take the heat anymore.

Miss Mildred has been with us since we moved to this house. She has been more than a simple electric appliance. Over the years she has been our partner in blogging and a best friend. A white perky squared Lady, she has four beautiful electric spiral coils and four knobs with heat ranging from 1 -10 with one oven knob with a special feature “broil”. A little bright red mole is her most attractive feature, allowing us to know when she was on/off duty. She has a towel bar and a broil drawer never used. This discreet and austere lady has given us nine years of joy. She has held up to tasks of baking cookies, braising lamb, roasting chickens, baking bread, simmering, boiling pots of soup, holding clay pots for beans, heavy griddles and little pots. Mildred has endured and kept on keeping on. It is with great sadness she is retiring. She has been the quintessential part of our cooking team making possible our cooking blog.

We would like for her to retire with dignity and for this we need your help.

We are in serious need to change this stove as fast as we can. We have a cookbook to write and our Mildred just quit on us. We need your help! With our savings we bought a new stove which is waiting in the garage to be installed. Unfortunately we miscalculated and thought that installing a gas line in our little kitchen would be very easy, which it is not. We need $4,000 to install the gas line, to pay the city permit, the sheet rock work, and a new hood extractor fitted for the gas stove.

This stove means a great deal to us, since we have invested all our time and efforts in this cooking blog. We have not monetized our blog with ads because we want the reader to enjoy our posts clear of gags. We love to share with you not only recipes, but cooking methods, stories, ingredients and cooking tips.

Our cookbook content is due at the end of March and we need to keep making and testing recipes. This book will mean the first economic return since we started our blog. It will really mean the world to us if you can help us with as little or as much you can to reach our installing stove goal.

In return we will be able to keep sharing more cooking recipes with you and making our best of efforts to complete this cookbook with you!

Gratefully and Sincerely,

Ian and Mariana McEnroe

We have created a Go fund me account, click here for donations:  https://www.gofundme.com/help-mildred-retire-with-dignity?ssid=808143814&pos=1  

If you feel generous, grateful, and thankful, we appreciate any kind of help. Right now, we are thinking of many ways to say thank you and reward your help. At this time we are kind in panic mode about the situation…although we are hoping for the best. We will keep you posted on perks we will be offering to say thank you.

There is always a reason to season,

Thank you so much!

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Sopes de Pollo – Chicken Sopes

sopes-de-pollo chicken sopes_yes-more-please!

Antojitos Mexicanos…These are the “small bites” in Mexican street food. Go to the fair or the Tianguis (street market) and they are the perfect food for an impromptu craving. Sopes de Pollo – Chicken Sopes is one of them. Take corn masa dough and create a small fried or grilled pattie and you have the foundation to add any kind of toppings you like; shredded chicken, beef, pork, picadillo, chorizo, longaniza, requeson (Mexican Ricotta), refried beans, carrots and potatoes, calabazitas, poblano rajas, mushrooms and many more options infinite possibilities. Then, top them off with a simple tomato salsa, shredded lettuce or cabbage, onions, radishes, crema and queso fresco or cotija cheese these little sopes are a small, highly crave-able meal unto themselves.

In Guadalajara, Jalisco, where I’m from, these fresh corn masa patties are called Sopes de Masa, or pellizcadas which translates into “pinched”. Why? Once these masa patties are cooked, on the comal or fried, the edges of these round patties are usually pinched all around to create a border leap that will hold all the fillings and topping goodness.

Usually this pinching is done by an experienced cook, a Grandma or an Aunt. These cooks that have developed Moctezuma fingers, with digital prints deleted by the generational hard word in the kitchen. Since these patties are piping hot, you need this kind of strong digital numbness to achive the results. Lucky you, this is not the only way to make Sopes. I will provide you with an easy solution using two spoons. You get to keep your fingerprints.

Now, the best way to make these home style masa sopes, relies on a key ingredient to have a crispy exterior sope and soft inside texture. It is to add a smashed potato to the masa. This gives the corn masa a soft tender bite and a lighter more delicate feel and flavor. Optimally, this recipe is best made with fresh masa. Read below for recommendations.

Fried or cooked on a comal? This is your choice. In my version I added a bit of oil to the griddle (comal) to give the sopes crispy edges and exterior without having to use a lot of oil for frying since its just for the two of us and small crowds. If you have more than 8 guests, pan frying them would be the ticket.

Are you ready to make some of the most delicious Sopes de Pollo – Chicken Sopes  in the comfort of your home kitchen? Lets cook!

Grab some cold Mexican beer or prepare some Agua Fresca, and the party is on!

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Sopes de Pollo – Chicken Sopes

Makes 8- 3″ round sopes

For the Masa:

1- ¼ cup fresh corn masa or Masa Harina, I prefer Minsa brand, or Maseca.
1 medium white potato, cooked, peeled and pureed
¼ teaspoon sea salt
¾ cup of warm water, add a few more teaspoons if needed

For the fillings:
2 cups shredded rotisserie chicken, about 3 pieces of chicken (skin removed)
1/2 cup refried beans, on the lose side, to make them more spreadable.

For other fillings variations check this 8 vegetable taco fillings that will work just as deliciously!

For the toppings:

1 cup shredded iceberg lettuce or green cabbage
¼ cup red onion, diced
4-6 radishes, thinly sliced
1-2 fresh Serrano peppers thinly sliced
½ cup queso fresco, crumbled
½ cup Crema Mexicana
1 cup simple tomato sauce

Simple tomato sauce:

2 large roma tomatoes, boiled and peeled*
2 garlic cloves
3 good pinches of dry oregano
1 pinch of ground cloves
¼ teaspoon sea salt

Place everything in the blender and puree. Add 1-2 tablespoons of water if the sauce is to thick.
*If tomatoes are out of season, I use roasted canned tomatoes from Muir Glenn.

Directions:

1. Prepare the masa by combining all the ingredients, mixing and kneading with your hands, until a soft dough ball that resembles a moist play-dough. Cover the ball with a damp clean kitchen towel and let it rest for 15 minutes.

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2. Heat up a heavy cast iron skillet, flat griddle, or a comal. Keep it under medium heat. Meantime…
3. Divide the dough into 8 round balls around 2-1/2”. Take one ball and with your fingers press to make a round flat shape. Then turn around a press again. Use your fingers to keep the round shape on the perimeter until you have a flat round patties around 3”-3 1/2” inches in diameter and about a little less than 1/2” inch thick.

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4. Add about 1 tablespoon of sunflower or vegetable oil to the comal and place each pattie on the comal as you keep shaping the rest of the masa. Check the patties every now and then, keep rotating them for even cooking. Give each pattie about 2-3 minutes per side. Start flipping them as they turn golden brown with a few toasty brown spots. Add a bit more oil to the comal when flipping them.

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5. Once both sides are cooked, transfer to a plate and with the help of two same size spoons , make an indentation on the sope about 3/8” from the perimeter, then position one of the spoons on the outside of the sope edge and the oder spoon on the indentation you just made. Gently press the masa in between the spoons, like if they were “spooning” to create the sope edge all around. If you feel confident enough, you can pinch the edges with your fingers but be very, very, careful for not burning yourself. This masa gets very hot. Do this to all eight of them, and place them in the warm comal at a low heat to keep them warm as you shape the rest of the sopes.

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6. Once all are ready, fun begins!, I like to spread some refried beans on the bottom, that is my glue, then fill them with the shredded chicken, garnish with lettuce, onions, radishes, spoonful of the simple tomato sauce, drizzle with crema, sprinkle crumbled queso fresco, some thinly sliced serranitos, salt and pepper to taste.

You can make a Salsa Verde like this for a variation, or a spicier salsa to serve on the side, like this ones could be a good option. Or your favorite hot sauce, mine: Cholula or Tapatio.

Serve warm and enjoy!sopes-de-pollo-preparation

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Sopes de Pollo - Chicken Sopes

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Sopes de Pollo

Yes more please!, cooking blog

Antojitos Mexicanos

Course Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 4

Ingredients

  • 1 -1/4 cup Fresh masa or masa harina, I prefer Minsa brand, or Maseca.
  • 1 medium white potato, cooked, peeled and pureed
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 3/4 cup warm water, add a few more teaspoons if needed

For the fillings:

  • 2 cups shredded rotisserie chicken, about 3 pieces of chicken (skin removed)
  • 1/2 cup refried beans, on the lose side, to make them more spreadable.

For the toppings:

  • 1 cup shredded iceberg lettuce or green cabbage
  • 1/4 cup red onion, diced
  • 4-6 radishes, thinly sliced
  • 1-2 Serrano peppers, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup queso fresco or cotija, crumbled
  • 1/2 cup crema Mexicana
  • 1 cup Simple tomato sauce, recipe follows

Simple tomato sauce

  • 2 large roma tomatoes, boiled and peeled*
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 3 good pinches of dry oregano
  • 1 pinch of ground cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

  1. 1. Prepare the masa by combining all the ingredients, mixing and kneading with your hands, until a soft dough ball that resembles a moist play-dough. Cover the ball with a damp clean kitchen towel and let it rest for 15 minutes.

    2. Heat up a heavy cast iron skillet, flat griddle, or a comal. Keep it under medium heat. Meantime...

    3. Divide the dough into 8 round balls around 2-1/2”. Take one ball and with your fingers press to make a round flat shape. Then turn around a press again. Use your fingers to keep the round shape on the perimeter until you have a flat round patties around 3”-3 1/2” inches in diameter and about a little less than 1/2” inch thick.

    4. Add about 1 tablespoon of sunflower or vegetable oil to the comal and place each pattie on the comal as you keep shaping the rest of the masa. Check the patties every now and then, keep rotating them for even cooking. Give each pattie about 2-3 minutes per side. Start flipping them as they turn golden brown with a few toasty brown spots. Add a bit more oil to the comal when flipping them.

    5. Once both sides are cooked, transfer to a plate and with the help of two same size spoons , make an indentation on the sope about 3/8” from the perimeter, then position one of the spoons on the outside of the sope edge and the oder spoon on the indentation you just made. Gently press the masa in between the spoons, like if they were “spooning” to create the sope edge all around. If you feel confident enough, you can pinch the edges with your fingers but be very, very, careful for not burning yourself. This masa gets very hot. Do this to all eight of them, and place them in the warm comal at a low heat to keep them warm as you shape the rest of the sopes.

    6. Once all are ready, fun begins!, I like to spread some refried beans on the bottom, that is my glue, then fill them with the shredded chicken, garnish with lettuce, onions, radishes, spoonful of the simple tomato sauce, drizzle with crema, sprinkle crumbled queso fresco, some thinly sliced serranitos, salt and pepper to taste.

    You can make a Salsa Verde like this for a variation, or a spicier salsa to serve on the side, like this ones could be a good option. Or your favorite hot sauce, mine: Cholula or Tapatio.

    Serve warm and enjoy!

Music Pairing: Chan -Chan ~ Buena Vista Social club

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Tempura Tex-m-pura Baby Eggplants

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This might be the ultimate way to eat baby eggplants.
Besides the great classic recipes used for bigger eggplants, like ratatouille, caponata, Baba ghanoush, grilling, stuffing or roasting them( which I love) I feel these dainty two-three inches nightshade gems deserve a more delicate approach. I’m always looking for a contrast in texture when eating something so custardy and creamy like the way the eggplants become when they are cooked. The solution for my craving for these tender and sweet eggplants: tempura batter.
I know you have seen eggplant tempura at your favorite Japanese restaurant. They mostly use the large eggplants, which are delicious but not near as delicate in  flavor as these babies. Wait until you try this dainty two bite goodness.
These Tempura baby Eggplants are an exhilarating bite. Imagine a bite that combines a light and crispy fried tempura coat with a warm custardy buttery eggplant interior. A beautiful object to be dipped on a tangy, salty, spicy, sweet sauce. Yes, all in one bite.
Are you with me? Or did you lose it at tempura coat?…
There are a lot of tempura recipes out there yielding different textures and results. After experimenting with different amounts of flours, egg, eggless, water, cold fizzy water, I think I found the formula and proportions that work for my tempura dreams. By far this tempura recipe is the one I find it has the right balance of flavor and texture, for me, tempura has to be extra crispy and light with a flavorful batter. This is what this tempura coat is all about: crispy and flavorful.

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Now lets make this tempura recipe our own. My spin is a hint of spice and using an Ale instead of the fizzy water. Texmpura, its what I call this, using one of my favorite Texas beer, “The Naked Nun” from Adelbert’s Brewery, an Austin, Texas …a local beer, this is all you need to transform this Tempura into a beer batter Texmpura that is flavorful, light, and extra crisp. If you can’t get Adelbert’s where you are I recommend a bright citrus beer, or a dos equis mexican beer instead. I’m sure by now you are as excited as I am, about eggplant season. Eggplants are available all year around, but the peak of eggplant season runs from July to October and baby eggplants are best found at local stores or farmer’s markets. If you are in Austin Tx, you can find these babies at Mueller Sunday’s Farmers market, Springdale Farms, Wholefoods or Central Market.
Now, my friends, please, do not limit yourself to eggplants, bring on the carrots, sweet potatoes, green beans, cauliflower, broccoli, green onions, mushrooms, beets, radishes, kohlrabi, parnsnips, squash, zucchini, Yes, please! bringing these vegetables along with baby eggplants to the party! That’s a must, although
Once you tried this Texmpura Baby Eggplants, its kind of a one vegetable party…
Have fun, Enjoy!

tempura-ingredients

Tempura Tex-m-pura Baby Eggplants

Serves 4-6 people

24 Baby eggplants, any kind will work, I used graffiti baby eggplants.
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1- 1 ½ cups grape seed oil or peanut oil to fry.
½ teaspoon sesame oil (optional), if you have it great it will give more flavor to the oil.
For the batter:
½ cup flour
½ cup cornstarch
1 egg
¼ teaspoon korean chili powder
1 pinch of salt
If making tempura: ¾ cup cold topo chico or any mineral water of your affection.
OR
If making tex-m-pura*: ¾ cup cold Ale I used “the naked nun”from Adelbert’s Brewery. Use any other citrus-y ale beer of your affection.
For Tex-mpura, substitute the fizzy water for a ligh or ambar beer of your affection. My suggestion, I love Austin, Adelbert’s Brewery its a local beer and my choice for this recipe will be “the naked nun” why well, as they described their beer: “THE ALE:  This ale has a well-rounded aroma of citrus notes, clove, and apple. It is refreshing and soft, with balanced hints of bitter orange peel and coriander”.

For the dipping sauce:
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons water
2 teaspoons rice vinegar
2 teaspoons lemon juice
2 teaspoosn honey
2 generous pinches of korean chili powder to sprinkle on the baby eggplants when serving.

Preparation method:
1. Cut the baby eggplants in fourths leaving the steam on, being careful not to cut all the way trough.
2. In a large bowl toss eggplants with 2 tablespoons of cornstarch.

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3. Make the dipping sauce by combining all ingredients. Set aside.
4. Prepare the tempura batter: On a medium size bowl combine the flour, cornstarch, chilli powder and salt, whisk. Add egg and fizzy mineral water OR the beer and whisk until just combined. Place batter bowl over a bowl with ice, and refigerate for 5 minutes, while your oil comes to temperature. One of the secrets for crispy tempura is to keep the batter chilled.

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5. In a small tall pot add the oil and heat it up to 350F/ 175C use a frying thermometer for best results.
Once the oil has reached the temperature, test your oil by dropping some batter into the oil. It should come afloat immediately. Now, take each eggplant by the steam and dip it on the cold tempura batter, promptly and carefully, gently drop the eggplant on the oil. With the help of a fork, drizzle on fast zigzag motion some of the batter on top of the eggplant that is on the oil. This will give extra bits of crispy batter morsels. Wait 1-2 minutes, and using some wood chopsticks or a spider skimmer and  flip the eggplant to the other side, wait 1 more minute, until its beautiful and light golden brown, take it out and place it on a wire rack.
Depending upon the size of your frying pot, you can fry 2-3 at the time, monitor the oil temperature every time you start a new batch. Too hot oil will scorch the batter, too cold oil will yield oily tempura.
Once you find your frying rhythm this process goes really fast!

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Serve immediately, eat while is warm, dip munch, crisp, repeat… enjoy!

Music Pairing: 17 Hippies “Saragina Rumba” Live in Berlin

tempura-baby-eggplants_texmpura_yes-more-please
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Tempura Tex-m-pura Baby Eggplants

www.yes-moreplease.com

THis might be the ultimate way to eat baby eggplants, crispy and creamy tender inside.

Course Appetizer, Side Dish
Cuisine FUSION, Japanese
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 25 minutes
Total Time 40 minutes
Servings 6 ninja-tex

Ingredients

  • 24 Baby eggplants, any kind will work, I used graffiti baby eggplants.
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch, for dusting the eggplants
  • 1- 1 ½ cups grape seed oil or peanut oil, to fry. to fry.
  • ½ teaspoon sesame oil (optional), if you have it great it will give more flavor to the oil.

For the batter:

  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2-4 pinches korean chili powder, some to use in the batter , some to sprinkle on the baby eggplants when serving.

For the dipping sauce:

  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 2 teaspoons rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons honey

Instructions

  1. 1. Cut the baby eggplants in fourths leaving the steam on, being careful not to cut all the way trough.

    2. In a large bowl toss eggplants with 2 tablespoons of cornstarch.

    3. Make the dipping sauce. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Set aside.

    4. Prepare the tempura batter: On a medium size bowl combine the flour, cornstarch, chilli powder and salt, whisk. Add egg and fizzy mineral water OR the beer and whisk until just combined. Place batter bowl over a bowl with ice, and refigerate for 5 minutes, while your oil comes to temperature.

    5. In a small tall pot add the oil and heat it up to 350F/ 175C use a frying thermometer for best results.

    6. Once the oil has reached the temperature, test your oil by dropping some batter into the oil. It should come afloat immediately. Now, take each eggplant by the steam and dip it on the cold tempura batter, promptly and carefully, gently drop the eggplant on the oil. With the help of a fork, drizzle on fast zigzag motion some of the batter on top of the eggplant that is on the oil. This will give extra bits of crispy batter morsels. Wait 1-2 minutes, and using some wood chopsticks or a spider skimmer and  flip the eggplant to the other side, wait 1 more minute, until its beautiful and light golden brown, take it out and place it on a wire rack.

    Depending upon the size of your frying pot, you can fry 2-3 at the time, monitor the oil temperature every time you start a new batch. Too hot oil will scorch the batter, too cold oil will yield oily tempura.
Once you find your frying rhythm this process goes really fast!

    Serve immediately, eat while is warm, dip munch, crisp, repeat... enjoy!

Recipe Notes

 

*For Tex-mpura, substitute the fizzy water for a ligh or ambar beer of your affection. My suggestion, I love Austin, Adelbert's Brewery its a local beer and my choice for this recipe will be “the naked nun” why well, as they described their beer: "THE ALE:  This ale has a well-rounded aroma of citrus notes, clove, and apple. It is refreshing and soft, with balanced hints of bitter orange peel and coriander".

Hello! That's what I want on my batter!

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Guajillo Pork Chops

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When I saw these succulent Porterhouse pork chops at the butcher shop, I knew they were coming home with me. Porterhouse pork chops are the Cadillac of chops. Divided by a “T” bone, these chops combine some of the best cuts of the tenderloin and the loin surrounded by a generous and beautiful ribbon of pork fat and their double thickness these chops are as luscious and succulent almost like having almost a steak. Thinking of how to prepare them, I could almost hear them whispering “Guajillo and garlic” to me, so there Guajillo Pork Chops for diner it was.

Chiles are one of my favorite ingredients in Mexican cooking, especially dry chiles. They work miracles in the kitchen. Dry or fresh, these beautiful capsicum fruits are not only about spicy heat;
fresh chiles can brighten up and give a spicy-sass flavor to any dish along with a bright loud note. Dry chiles add a pleasant intense depth of flavor from smokey-sweet, to spicy and fruity, floral and fruity notes with a pleasant hint of spice. Dry chiles are a must have in your pantry.
Dry Guajillos are the perfect example I just described. Guajillos, when slightly toasted, fried or hydrated, bloom with the most aromatic, intense color and mild fruity heat flavor. This effect is irresistible and best used with pork because the meat’s flavor still shines through.

I just knew this Guajillo-Garlic adobo is what these chops needed. In the blink of an eye, I was in the kitchen prepping and making this recipe come to life. I toasted the guajillo chiles to awaken the oils and flavor, then removed the seeds cut into strips and sauteed them in a little oil along with comino seeds and copious amounts of garlic. All these toasted ingredients went into the molcajete to be ground by hand. Using the molcajete is one of my favorite pleasures in the kitchen to smell the aromas that the combination of ingredients emanate from the friction of the volcanic stone. Feeling how the ingredients are being transformed, is such a rewarding cooking process for me. Once the chiles start to become a coarse paste, I incorporated the vinegar and there it was… Guajillo Adobo. This adobo can be ground as coarse or fine as you prefer. I left it medium coarse for this recipe , to add texture to the rub. When its was time to marry the flavors first a gave a good pan sear on the chops, added the adobo, basted the pork chops, and finished in the oven. The smell in the kitchen was insane! The moment I sliced the chop it was juicy, and succulent.
I try not to ever say “you should”… but in this case I will say “you must” try this recipe.
Have fun in the kitchen!

guajillo-pork-chops-yesmore-please

Guajillo Pork Chops

Makes 2 1b. Chops serves 2-4

2 -2” thick Porterhouse Pork Chops*, about 1lb each.
Sea salt and black pepper to season the chops
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon butter

For the brine:

1 cups warm water,
1/2 kosher salt
1/2 cup sugar
1 cup ice
1 bay leaf

For the adobo:

4 dry Guajillo peppers
8 cloves fresh garlic, peeled
¼ teaspoon comino seeds
1 teaspoon sea salt
Fresh crushed Black Pepper
3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/2 teaspoon agave nectar.

Preparation Method:

1. In a glass bowl, dissolve sugar and salt into the warm water. Add ice, let it melt,add bay leaf. Add pork chops cover with plastic wrap or a lid, let them rest over night or at least 2-4 hours.
2. Take the pork chops out of the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before cooking them. To become room temperature, this will ensure even cooking and tender, juicy chops. Remove pork chops from brine and pat dry really well. Set aside.
3. In a cast iron pan, slightly toast the Guajillo peppers until pliable and they change color. Remove from heat, let them cool a bit. Using kitchen scissors remove the chile tails and shake them to remove all seeds. Cut the chiles into thin rings.
4. Heat up a cast iron pan, make sure your chops fit loosely on the pan you will use. Add oil and warm up, add garlic, comino seeds, and the thinly cut guajillo. Saute for 2 -3 minutes until Guajillos are deep red and garlic is light golden brown. Remove pan from heat.

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5. With a slotted spoon transfer the sauteed guajillos, garlic and cominos to a molcajete or stone mortar. Add sea salt and grind by hand until a coarse paste. Add the vinegar, agave nectar and grind a few more times until well incorporated.
This can be done on a small food processor pulsing 3-4 times, add the vinegar and pulse 2 more times until you have a coarse paste. Reserve paste set aside.

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6. In the same cast iron pan, utilizing the garlic-Guajillo infused oil left in the pan, bring the pan to a medium high heat. Season the pork chops both sides and around the edges with sea salt and pepper. Sear the chops for about 2-3 minutes per side and sear the chops all around standing them on their sides. This will render some of the pork fat and also will give a nice crust to the chops.
7. Once all sides are seared, bring down the heat to medium low and carefully tilt the pan, add the Guajillo adobo paste, into that oil. Be careful this might splash. Place pan flat and start basting the chops with this paste-oil for a couple of minutes. Top pork chops with a couple of spoonfuls of the guajillo adobo, add about ½ tablespoon butter on top of each pork chop.

Place the pan into the preheated oven at 425 for about 6-8 minutes.
Insert a meat thermometer, they should read between:
140-145F for medium rare.
Remove pan from oven and rest them in the pan for 3 minutes, transfer to a board or warm platter and rest them for 2 minutes.
155-160F for well done.
Remove pan from oven and let them rest in the pan for 3-5 minutes for well done. Transfer to a plater and serve.

Notes:

I always remove my pork chops from the heat about 5 degrees before they reach the highest temperature, the reminder heat will carry on and will keep cooking the chops, while you baste them, with out over cooking them. New guidelines in cooking temperature from the USDA have allow our sweet pork not being overcooked, living us with a tender, juicer pork.
Check this link for more information:
www.pork.org/new-usda-guidelines-lower-pork-cooking-temperature/

*If you are in Austin, visit Salt & Time for amazing porterhouse pork chops, or Smith and Smith Farms ask for Colby at the Texas Farmers Markets on Sundays at Mueller and Domain location

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Music Pairing: Cantaloupe Island- Herbie Hancock

 

 

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Guajillo Pork Chops

www.yes-moreplease.com

The great delicate fruity middle spice guajillo and garlic adobo over these porter house pork chops is to die for. Serve them with mashed sweet potatoes, and a generous green salad with a generous squeeze of lemon or lime, salt and pepper. Enjoy!

Course Main Course
Cuisine Mexican
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 2" Porterhouse Pork Chops, about 1 lb each.
  • 1 tablespoon Extra virgin Olive Oil
  • Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to season the chops
  • 1 tablespoon butter

For the brine:

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 cup ice
  • 1 piece bay leaf

For the Guajillo Adobo:

  • 4 dry Guajilllo peppers
  • 8 cloves garlic, fresh
  • 1/4 teaspoon comino seeds
  • 1 teaspoons sea salt
  • Fresh crushed black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons Apple cider Vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon agave nectar

Instructions

  1. 1. In a glass bowl, dissolve sugar and salt into the warm water. Add ice, let it melt, add bay leaf. Add pork chops cover with plastic wrap or a lid, let them rest over night or at least 2-4 hours.

    2. Take the pork chops out of the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before cooking them. To become room temperature, this will ensure even cooking and tender, juicy chops. Remove pork chops from brine and pat dry really well. Set aside.

    3. In a cast iron pan, slightly toast the Guajillo peppers until pliable and they change color. Remove from heat, let them cool a bit. Using kitchen scissors remove the chile tails and shake them to remove all seeds. Cut the chiles into thin rings.

    4. Heat up a cast iron pan, make sure your chops fit loosely on the pan you will use. Add oil and warm up, add garlic, comino seeds, and the thinly cut guajillo. Saute for 2 -3 minutes until Guajillos are deep red and garlic is light golden brown. Remove pan from heat.

    5. With a slotted spoon transfer the sauteed guajillos, garlic and cominos to a molcajete or stone mortar. Add sea salt and grind by hand until a coarse paste. Add the vinegar, agave nectar and grind a few more times until well incorporated.

    This can be done on a small food processor pulsing 3-4 times, add the vinegar and pulse 2 more times until you have a coarse paste. Reserve paste set aside.

    6. In the same cast iron pan, utilizing the garlic-Guajillo infused oil left in the pan, bring the pan to a medium high heat. Season the pork chops both sides and around the edges with sea salt and pepper. Sear the chops for about 2-3 minutes per side and sear the chops all around standing them on their sides. This will render some of the pork fat and also will give a nice crust to the chops.

    7. Once all sides are seared, bring down the heat to medium low and carefully tilt the pan, add the Guajillo adobo paste, into that oil. Be careful this might splash. Place pan flat and start basting the chops with this paste-oil for a couple of minutes. Top pork chops with a couple of spoonfuls of the guajillo adobo, add about ½ tablespoon butter on top of each pork chop.

    Place the pan into the preheated oven at 425 for about 6-8 minutes.

    Insert a meat thermometer, they should read between:

    140-145F for medium rare.

    Remove pan from oven and rest them in the pan for 3 minutes, transfer to a board or warm platter and rest them for 2 minutes.

    155-160F for well done.

    Remove pan from oven and let them rest in the pan for 3-5 minutes for well done. Transfer to a plater and serve.

Recipe Notes

Notes:

I always remove my pork chops from the heat about 5 degrees before they reach the highest temperature, the reminder heat will carry on and will keep cooking the chops, while you baste them, with out over cooking them. New guidelines in cooking temperature from the USDA have allow our sweet pork not being overcooked, living us with a tender, juicer pork.
Check this link for more information:
www.pork.org/new-usda-guidelines-lower-pork-cooking-temperature/

*If you are in Austin, visit Salt & Time for amazing porterhouse pork chops, or Smith and Smith Farms ask for Colby at the Texas Farmers Markets on Sundays at Mueller and Domain location

Happy Cooking!

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